Cheminent through the underlying brightness but has "Broken Light" by Allyson Clay
June 12, 2012

By Michel D'Encausse.

Right here in oneself, the world is there, visible and invisible, the adventure of a ray of light, taste, the flow from the still. 
The immemorial now, what remains whatever happens, Mirror mirror before and look behind the eyes are one, only the reflections create the world. 
Calligraphy which leads to reveal or to lose, salvation or the labyrinth, hello inside the maze as soon as consciousness allows itself to be...

By Michel D'Encausse.

Right here in oneself, the world is there, visible and invisible, the adventure of a ray of light, taste, the flow from the still. 
The immemorial now, what remains whatever happens, Mirror mirror before and look behind the eyes are one, only the reflections create the world. 
Calligraphy which leads to reveal or to lose, salvation or the labyrinth, hello inside the maze as soon as consciousness allows itself to be itself. 
Calligraphy of self-giving, the layout, updating the book of life. 
Once the giant letters, perpetual, are more readable, more visible, the Labyrinth unfolds. 
Maze of our thoughts and our actions goes everywhere without going anywhere. 
The world is a mirror of the soul, but without wisdom, the soul can only look without seeing, without really know. 
gaze contemplating this cascade of mirrors or those fleeting illuminations glosses over these reflective surfaces, without support, the ephemeral can not restrain him, he can only perform the overview, the rest being the ice water landscapes breathtaking. 
It was while contemplating the whole work that can be achieved, savor the invisible light, in itself and lead to the "mirror of simple souls annihilated" by Marguerite Porete. 
Sign Light , traces of gaze, asceticism is very pleasant here, which is deformed is not for long, just continue his quest to walk to the transparency and light reflective material and the ease of cutting The translucent corridor of the work, outweigh the pictures. 
The smile of the artist is indeed present here, culture is also invigorating as a walk in Vancouver between the trees and the ocean.

For the original French version visit : http://www.barthete.com/manif2009.php

Private Matters, Public Matters: Allyson Clay, Osman Bozkurt, Milutin Gubash
June 12, 2012

Strand on Volta Gallery, October 21 – November 6, 2005

Catalogue Essay by Lucy Hogg

Some of us can remember getting on airplanes in 1960s, when everyone dressed up for the event of flying. In old photographs all the men seem to wear suits, and women’s hair is done. Telephone calls  were also less casual. There were fewer of them, and the minutes cost; party lines demanded decorum.

Public events also had more restraint...

Strand on Volta Gallery, October 21 – November 6, 2005

Catalogue Essay by Lucy Hogg

Some of us can remember getting on airplanes in 1960s, when everyone dressed up for the event of flying. In old photographs all the men seem to wear suits, and women’s hair is done. Telephone calls  were also less casual. There were fewer of them, and the minutes cost; party lines demanded decorum.

Public events also had more restraint. A death would have certain rituals, a laying out, a wake, a burial. Grieving had its own formality. Now it can be either very private, with a few comments over a plastic  box of ashes, or very public but still casual; an impromptu pile of flowers, stuffed toys and other sentimental mementos placed at an otherwise banal location (a telephone pole, a parking lot, a median strip) mark an accident or disappearance.

The public park was perhaps the first place where the boundaries of public and private started to blur, but a hundred years earlier. With the invention of the weekend, the “banlieue” of Monet’s boating parties -then newly accessible by suburban trains-  was a place where classes mixed. The mid 19th century was a defining moment of class mobility, as the expanding petite bourgeoisie tried on the attitudes of the leisure class. Domesticated life of all kinds was spilling outside, to the dismay and fascination of contemporary commentators.

In Public Matters, Private Matters, the video works of Allyson Clay, Osman Bozkurt, and Milutin Gubash try to make sense of the blurring of public and private space in the 21st century.

Read the full article: http://lucyhoggwritingaboutotherartists.wordpress.com/2012/03/05/186/

Lucy Hogg reviews Allyson Clay at Kamen Gallery (2005)
June 12, 2012

(a shorter version of this was published as a review in Canadian Art, Winter, 2005)

The books were all on the shelves in no order, as if the maids had unpacked them and nobody had ever set them in some kind of reasonable sequence.  She wondered how long it would actually take to find the book she was looking for. Maybe it was a different kind of life their owners lived, where they had time to meander over the titles, divagate until the original reason for the search reappeared....

(a shorter version of this was published as a review in Canadian Art, Winter, 2005)

The books were all on the shelves in no order, as if the maids had unpacked them and nobody had ever set them in some kind of reasonable sequence.  She wondered how long it would actually take to find the book she was looking for. Maybe it was a different kind of life their owners lived, where they had time to meander over the titles, divagate until the original reason for the search reappeared. The colour of a dust jacket, the thickness or height of a book, a vague memory that it had last been found on an upper or lower shelf would move their eyes over the whole collection.

How did the fish in the bowl know that the small pellet of food was not speck of dirt, a flake of paint from the ceiling, or a mouse dropping?

 

Read the full article:  http://lucyhoggwritingaboutotherartists.wordpress.com/2012/03/05/196/

Western Front Artist in Residence
June 7, 2012

http://front.bc.ca/events/artist-in-residence-allyson-clay/

Sep 8 – Oct 10, 2008

Western Front Media Arts and Western Front Exhibitions are pleased to announce Vancouver-based artist Allyson Clay as Artist-in-Residence for New Strategies in Feminist Video. Working in collaboration with poets Lisa Robertson and Nathalie Stephens, Allyson Clay will produce elements of a performative...

http://front.bc.ca/events/artist-in-residence-allyson-clay/

Sep 8 – Oct 10, 2008

Western Front Media Arts and Western Front Exhibitions are pleased to announce Vancouver-based artist Allyson Clay as Artist-in-Residence for New Strategies in Feminist Video. Working in collaboration with poets Lisa Robertson and Nathalie Stephens, Allyson Clay will produce elements of a performative video work exploring the phenomenon of “interior speech,” the silent conversation that one has with oneself as if speaking to another person. The project explores silence as loudness and critiques the univocality of the speaking subject, blurring simplistic binaries around gender and sexuality. In exploring the notion of doubling, reflection, and mirroring of the self, the artists will make an experimental space in which they engage with “feminism” in terms of refusal, expression and potential. Works in progress will be featured in The F-word, a group exhibition of feminist media co-curated by Alissa Firth-Eagland and Candice Hopkins.

Allyson Clay is a Vancouver-based artist. She has exhibited widely in Canada and internationally over the past 20 years.

Lisa Robertson and Nathalie Stephens are poets currently based in Oakland and Chicago respectively. Lisa Robertson was a member of the Kootenay School of Writing from 1990 to 2000, and works as freelance writer, editor and teacher. Nathalie Stephens is a bilingual writer of many publications, including her forthcoming book Carnet de desaccords.